Black male patient looks out a clinic window.

Cancer deaths decline in Black Americans, but disparities persist

Mortality among Black men and women remains higher than all other groups.

By Ian Ingram, MedPage Today

The cancer death rate among Black Americans has declined over the past two decades, but remains elevated compared to all other racial and ethnic groups, a cross-sectional study indicated.

From 1999 to 2019, a large decrease in the annual cancer death rate was observed among Black individuals, on the magnitude of 200 per 100,000 Black men and 75 per 100,000 Black women, reported Wayne R. Lawrence, DrPH, of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, and colleagues.

The cancer death rate among Black Americans has declined over the past two decades, but remains elevated compared to all other racial and ethnic groups, a cross-sectional study indicated.

From 1999 to 2019, a large decrease in the annual cancer death rate was observed among Black individuals, on the magnitude of 200 per 100,000 Black men and 75 per 100,000 Black women, reported Wayne R. Lawrence, DrPH, of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, and colleagues.

These decreases translated into average annual reductions in cancer deaths of 2.6% for men and 1.5% for women, according to their findings in JAMA Oncology.

Drops in lung cancer deaths represented the largest absolute decreases for Black men and women alike: 78.5 and 19.5 fewer deaths per 100,000, respectively, by the final year of the study. And death rates steadily fell for most cancer types, with the greatest observed declines seen with lung cancer in men (-3.8% annual change) and gastric cancer in women (-3.4% annual change). Read more …